Segway Sensation Comes To Seppeltsfield

Seppeltsfield has partnered with local South Australian business, Segway Sensation SA, to bring Segway tours to the estate from 1st November this year. The partnership will initially see Segway tours offered three times daily on weekends and public holidays, where guests are guided on a one hour trail throughout the Seppeltsfield estate grounds and vineyards.

Segway Vineyard Tours

Segway tours in the Vineyard (image supplied)

The winery will be the first in South Australia to offer Segway tours to the public. The battery-operated, two-wheeled, personal transportation vehicles have become popular in recent years with tourism sites and city commuters, whereby users can command movement by simply shifting their weight forward or backward on a platform. The US built Segways rely on dynamic stabilisation, whereby advanced sensing enables a safe a smooth ride for even first time users. The partnership comes as a complement to the redevelopment of Seppeltsfield’s Cellar Door, incoming FINO restaurant and the current JamFactory Art & Design Studios, all of which have been added to the property to build a critical mass of tourism interests.

Segway Sensation SA owners, Cindy Chynoweth and Shane Camilleri, said bringing Segways to Seppeltsfield was a fantastic opportunity. “Having discussed the concept with several tourism bodies, we were enthused at the prospect of being based at Seppeltsfield”, said Cindy. “The estate is breathtakingly beautiful – from gorgeous gardens, palm lined roads, heritage buildings and ancient vineyard, it seems perfect for discovery by Segway”, she added.

Seppeltsfield and Segway Sensation SA will be launching their tours on Saturday 1st November. Public are able to select from a 1 hour Segway tour at $99 or a package which includes lunch at the estate’s picnic grounds for $127.

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Tasmania – ‘wild and dramatic, cultured and quirky, isolated yet accessible.’

When the world’s most trusted travel publisher as internationally announced that Tassie is ‘ripe for the picking’.  Lonely Planet named Tasmania one of the world’s top regions to visit in 2015 – the only destination in Australia or New Zealand to make the list.

Naming Tasmania as number four in the “Top 10 Regions in the World to Visit in 2015″ in their Best in Travel 2015 publication, Lonely Planet says ‘the Tassie food scene is a gourmet’s paradise, best exemplified by the diversity of produce found in the wilds of Bruny Island. Whether it’s getting a frisky fill of oysters at Get Shucked Oyster Farm, downing a few glasses of pinot noir at Australia’s most southern winery, or gorging on freshly picked berries from the local berry farm, there’s no better place to taste Tassie on a plate.

Bruny Island Oysters (Image supplied by Tourism Tasmania)

Bruny Island Oysters (Image supplied by Tourism Tasmania)

“There’s a spotlight shining on Tassie at the moment, and it’s only going to get brighter following this latest announcement by Lonely Planet” said John Fitzgerald, CEO of Tourism Tasmania. “Tassie has always had so much to offer visitors who journey to Australia’s island state, and the latest accolade from Lonely Planet cements our place globally as a destination of world-class natural, cultural, heritage and gourmet experiences, all within easy reach of each other.”

Tasmania is rapidly losing its long held status as one of Australia’s ‘hidden gems’. Visitors are lured by an island which epitomises some of the key strengths of Australia’s international appeal – raw, unspoilt natural beauty and incredible fresh food, wine and culinary experiences.

Tourism Australia’s latest global food and wine campaign – Restaurant Australia – culminates in Tasmania next month, with a gala dinner at MONA for 80 of the world’s most influential food and wine figures.

But it’s not only the flavours that feature. Lonely Planet encourages travellers to ‘descend the spiralled staircase of Hobart’s uber-trendy subterranean MONA,’ applauds Tasmania’s wilds, and highlights the much anticipated opening of Australia’s premier coastal bushwalking experience, the Three Capes Track.  Tasmania’s regions are also acclaimed, with the Tarkine, Cradle Mountain, Bay of Fires and Franklin River among the ‘diverse, remote and wild outdoor experiences’ highlighted by Lonely Planet.

For more information on Tasmania, visit  www.discovertasmania.com.au.

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2013 Dodgy Brothers Shiraz: Tasting Note

The 2013 Dodgy Brothers Shiraz definitely tells you it is Shiraz on the nose.  Good intensity, sweet ripe dark fruit, rare meat, and some raspberry liquorice component.  Suggestions of lavender, and red currant jelly keeps it interesting.

Dodgy Brothers of McLaren Vale

Dodgy Brothers of McLaren Vale

On the palate the Dodgy Brother Shiraz is soft and supple, ripe plums and crack black pepper – all the usual suspects in McLaren Vale Shiraz.  While the colour looks dense and solid purple, and being full bodied, the tannins are still supple and opulent.  I could see it complementing a wide range of foods (especially BBQ) or also just drinking it by itself.

As it says on the label; “cellar for up to 10 years – or drink tomorrow.”

Also check out the Dodgy Brothers 2013 GSM.

RRP $28
Alc 14.5%
Region: McLaren Vale
Source: Provided by producer

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2013 Dodgy Brothers GSM – Eminently slurpable

Dodgy by name, but I assume not dodgy by nature, and definitely not dodgy wine.  But this is some good drinking wine, jam pack full of enjoyment and pleasure.  With its upside down labels, it would stand out on the wineshop shelf.  Dodgy Brothers is a partnership between a grower (Peter Sommerville), a viticulturist (Peter Bolte) and a Canadian winemaker (Wes Pearson). Based in McLaren Vale, and with limited volumes, it’s best to check out their website for availability.

The 2013 Dodgy Brother Grenache Shiraz Mourvedre, (70%, 18% & 12% respectively), immediately grabbed my attention.  Not because it was big and intense, or because it had one specific character which stood out, but basically because I wanted another glass.  And isnt that what wine is supposed to be about – pure enjoyment.

Dodgy Brothers GSM

Dodgy Brothers GSM

The nose of the Dodgy Brothers GSM had vibrant red fruit confectionary, good intensity, lots of floral violet earthy characters.  Hints of warm spices like cinnamon, nutmeg, and black pepper.  On the palate, there was both dark fruit (plums, dark berries) complemented by red fruit (ripe cherries, wild strawberries).  Soft velvety tannins, and fresh acid.  It is at once voluminous but not lacking, nor too intense. Eminently slurpable, and keeps you coming back for more.

Not all that dodgy really.

Also have a look at the Dodgy Brothers 2013 Shiraz.

RRP $28
Alc 14.5%
Region: McLaren Vale
Source: Provided by producer

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Fino at Seppeltsfield, Opening Date Announced

Barossa winery, Seppeltsfield, has announced its redeveloped c1900 National Trust Cellar Door and new restaurant partners, FINO at Seppeltsfield, will open officially to public on Saturday 22nd November 2014.

The much anticipated Barossa development has been a hive of activity since March when works commenced, with significant exterior and interior constructions continuing to take place.  Once Fino at Seppeltsfield is completed, it will be the most significant architectural transformation to the Seppeltsfield estate in 94 years.  The 3 million dollar project has been conceptualised by architect Max Pritchard (who also designed Kangaroo Island Southern Ocean Lodge) and landscape architect Brenton Hann (Yalumba, Chateau Tanunda) in partnership with Seppeltsfield Managing Director, Warren Randall.

Established in 1851, Seppeltsfield is the only winery in the world to release a 100 year old, single vintage wine each year.  The property has 12 heritage-listed buildings and the iconic 2,000 palm trees and will make an ideal home to Fino @ Seppeltsfiled in the western Barossa.

Fino at Seppeltsfield

Seppeltsfield Vintage Tawny (image supplied)

FINO at Seppeltsfield will be lead by chef David Swain and Sharon Romeo with the front of house.  They will continue to operate the Willunga (SA’s Fleurieu Peninsula) restaurant. Opened in 2006, FINO Willunga has amassed more accolades than any other South Australian restaurant in recent times, including regular listings in The Australian’s Hot 50 Restaurants, three-time hall of fame in the Australian Gourmet Traveller Wine awards.

Romeo says the two restaurants will share the same look (oak tables and bentwood chairs) and ethos (simple regional and seasonal food), but will offer different experiences.  They will be offering a classic a la carte menu featuring Barossan produce.  This will be supported by an eclectic wine list of Australian wines, including all the Seppeltsfield house wines and fortifieds.

Fino @ Seppeltsfield will have lunch 7 days a week, dinner Friday, Saturday & Sunday. Bar food available 7 days. Address: 730 Seppeltsfield Rd, Seppeltsfield, South Australia 5355.  Book on www.fino.net.au

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d’Arenberg 2010 Dead Arm Shiraz: Tasting Note

While definitely the icon of the Icon series of d’Arenberg wines, it’s not the most expensive in their ever increasing lineup of wines.  Along with the others (Ironstone Pressings and Coppermine Road) in the Icon series, the Dead Arm Shiraz has been given an updated look. And very smart it is to.

d'Arenberg Icons

d’Arenberg Icons

What’s inside the 2010 Dead Arm Shiraz is also very smart, and over-delivers for the price.  The aroma is dark and abundant.  Dark fruits of plums and sweet damp earth.  There’s the typical d’Arenberg savoury Indian spice (dusty fennel seed, white pepper) in the background there too.

On the palate – wow!  Reminds me of a Facebook relationship status – “it’s complicated”.  Overflowing with fruit; more rich dark plums, ripe mulberries bursting with juice. The distinctive McLaren Vale black olive, or black olive brine.  A savoury soy character balances the fruit intensity, and stops it from being too much.  Black pepper spice, and other warm spices add yet more interest.  It’s a big wine with fine drying tannins.  It … lingers …a … loooong  …  time.  As always with d’Arenberg Dead Arm I would expect to cellar 15-20 years, but given the 2010 vintage possibly more.

What would I match with it?  Probably just a big glass – and have it by itself.

RRP $65
Alc 14%
Region: McLaren Vale
Source: Provided by producer

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